What they really mean is they’re not keeping tabs on what you’re up to online, and it’s likely because they’re leading busy lives themselves, where checking up on you is not at the top of their priority list.

These comments only come from friends or family, so of course they’re not completely out of the loop. They know the kind of person you are as well as the kind of work you engage in. They’re probably not completely up to date with your projects, but they have some idea of what you’re up to from the time they talked with you three years ago.

But blogs, podcasts, videos, social media posts, etc. are not how they communicate. Likely, they are very “analog.” They use the internet, and they’re probably experts at sending texts, but they like to have most of their conversations on the phone or in person. Otherwise, they can’t be bothered.

This isn’t a problem to be solved, per se, but if you want to keep in touch with these friends, you must approach the issue from another angle. More web-based updates are not going to help them get “in the loop.” It’s an exercise in futility, and it can be frustrating for us internet natives.

This is where physical items, like cards, newsletters, or books come in. Besides the “cliché” but nevertheless welcome art of sending birthday and Christmas cards, print newsletters can be a great way to keep your friends in the know – especially if you have many updates to share.

And, if like me, you’re frequently publishing new books, you can find favor with your friends by sending them your new creations.

Whoever said you could “do it all online” got it completely wrong. Some of your best friends and closest family members have no clue what’s going on in your life unless you’re making the effort to let them know. The same goes for some of your prospects and customers.

At the risk of sounding salesy, it’s lovingly strategic to spread your message the old-fashioned way. By sending physical goods to your friends and family, you’ll naturally:

  • Generate more referrals and business
  • Tap into word of mouth
  • Encourage more sharing and participation
  • Attract collaborators and investors
  • Foster goodwill
  • And more

Yes, there’s a cost to sending postal mail. But in the long run, it benefits you and those around you more than you might assume.

So, the next time someone says, “I’m Not on Facebook,” ask them for their mailing address and promptly send them your pamphlet, magazine article, new CD, or otherwise.

P.S. Thanks again for dropping by. I’m currently working on a brand-new book called the Productivity, Performance & Profits Blackbook. This new resource encompasses everything I’ve ever learned about getting more done, plus some amazing insights from the hundreds of entrepreneurs, executives, and artists I’ve interviewed over the years.

This book normally costs $57 USD, but between now and February 28, 2023, you can pre-order the book for just $10 USD. Time is running out, so don’t delay. Click HERE to pre-order the Productivity, Performance & Profits Blackbook now.