Talk About it Everywhere You Go

Talk About it Everywhere You Go

You should only have two or three conversations that are top of mind. Ever.

If you’re looking for a romantic partner, everyone within earshot should hear you talking about how you’re looking for a romantic partner.

If you want to grow your business, you should be sharing what it is you’re looking to create with everyone you encounter.

If you’re looking for a new home, you should bring it up every opportunity you can.

I’m not talking about taking over conversations or rudely interrupting people. I’m talking about being intentional with what you talk about. Words have creative power.

Words have creative power. Share on X

You may assume everyone else is aware of what’s painfully obvious to you. But you’d be surprised to find how many people simply don’t have a clue, and even assume you’re probably happy with how things are in your life in right now.

It’s counterintuitive, given that the inconvenience of being human is that you’re always going to want more.

The inconvenience of being human is that you’re always going to want more. Share on X

Either way, imagine the difference having these conversations would make. Don’t talk about what you think you deserve or what you think you can or can’t have. Only talk about what it is you’re creating.

Talk about what you want everywhere you go. That’s how you create it.

Talk about what you want everywhere you go. That’s how you create it. Share on X
Journaling the Reality You Want to Create

Journaling the Reality You Want to Create

At different times in my life, I’ve adopted journaling as a daily habit.

And journaling has proven useful, especially with regards to #StrategySunday sessions, speculating on possibilities, dumping emotional baggage, and more.

But only now am I starting to see the creative power of journaling.

Your future can be created in your journal.

You can draw pictures of the things you desire, and they will manifest at unprecedented speeds.

You can complete anything, including trauma, your relationship to people who’ve passed, things you are dissatisfied with (about yourself or with your life), or otherwise.

And completion is especially powerful, as it creates a space for new possibilities.

Bring intention to your journaling practice, and you can begin creating anything you want in life. But don’t doubt the process. Don’t worry about when the things you desire will manifest. Simply create.

TQP 012: Words – Beacons of Creative Power or Mere Devices of Communication I

TQP 012: Words - Beacons of Creative Power or Mere Devices of Communication IIn the movie, What the Bleep Do We Know!?, a reference is made to how the molecular structure of water can be affected by the words, thoughts and feelings it is consistently exposed to.

This isn’t something they pulled out of thin air. It is based on the studies of Dr. Masaru Emoto, a Japanese author, researcher and entrepreneur.

Dr. Emoto was born in Yokohama Japan in 1943. He graduated from Yokohama Municipal University and began his studies on water in the mid-90s.

Emoto believed that water is the “blueprint of our reality”, and that emotional vibrations could change the physical structure of water. He claimed that water exposed to positive speech and thoughts would create visually pleasing crystals, while negative thoughts would results in ugly crystal formations.

It is said that 70 to 80% of the Earth’s surface is water. You might be able to think of something else that consists of 70 to 80% water – our bodies.

This causes one to wonder whether or not there is any connection between the words we speak and the lives we live. If words, thoughts and feelings can change the molecular structure of water, then what are the implications for the things we say to ourselves and to the people we routinely come into contact with? How do the things we say affect our lives?

Are words beacons of creative power, or are they mere devices of communication?

In this episode of The Question podcast, you will hear highlights from David Andrew Wiebe’s presentation on Words, and the music of Frederick Tamagi.

Thank you for listening!

What questions will you be taking with you after listening to this episode?

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