This post is part of The Renegade Musician Series.

Most musicians don’t want to pay a cent for anything.

Ever heard the saying, “you get what you pay for?”

Well, if you don’t pay for your information, you aren’t just getting low-quality, “who gives a crap who wrote it” freelancer blog posts, you also aren’t taking it seriously enough to produce a breakthrough in your career in the first place.

Knowledge isn’t power. Wisdom is. Wisdom is knowledge applied.

Knowledge isn’t power. Wisdom is. Wisdom is knowledge applied. Click To Tweet

Most musicians are too cheap, too lazy, and too scared to test.

You’re not a Renegade Musician if you aren’t a go-getter.

Imagine ordering 200 CDs for your next release. You pay the studio engineer. You pay the mastering engineer. You pay the graphic designer. But you don’t pay for the physical CDs. Somehow, you manage to find a service that replicates CDs for free.

Then, imagine when your order finally arrives at your door… what’s this? A picture of 200 CDs?!

You got what you paid for.

If this all sounds esoteric, then know that some have fallen for a similar scheme on eBay, where they betted on the latest iPhone without reading the fine print: “Note: You are betting on a picture of the phone.”

Don’t try to shortcut the shortcut.

The sooner you’re willing to pay for your education, services, and team, the sooner you can progress in your music career. If you make a big deal about costs now, things aren’t going to get any easier down the line. There will only be a bigger price to pay.

The sooner you’re willing to pay for your education, services, and team, the sooner you can progress in your music career. Click To Tweet

In due time, You’ll need to pay for your domain name, hosting, Email Service Provider, app subscriptions, advertising, graphics, photography, videography, merch, CD replication, studio time, mixing and mastering, and even team members. The costs are only going to mount and grow.

Get used to the idea of finding the best tools and people for the job. Get used to spending more on your career. You can only build more tolerance in this area by making the commitment first and problem solving later.

Today, spending $100 might seem like a lot. In time, you’ll drop $1,000 in one spot without blinking an eye.