It’s goofy.

I spent years earning my personal freedom. And it happened in stages, not in a vacuum.

I first got a sense of what was available in 2011. And by that, I mean I started to see the possibility for being able to do life on my own terms. I also knew that doing so would require a strong financial footing and multiple income streams.

But at first, I couldn’t decide what to focus on. In the next year or two, I joined two network marketing companies. I started multiple niche websites. I even invested in a music industry tech startup.

This ultimately wasn’t sustainable, and long story long, I began 2015 with no more than $700 in my bank account.

In fall 2014, though, I started picking up the work I had previously said “no” to – so, before I knew it, I was doing content work at home, engaging in community work, teaching guitar at night, and working as a casual theater tech at the university in the cracks.

Some onlookers called this “organized chaos” and that wasn’t too far from the truth.

In summer 2016, because of the effort I’d put in, I was able to start working entirely from home. Content work was getting especially lucrative. I kept engaging in community work, however, because I was passionate about it. I was also able to get back into music in a meaningful way.

In many ways, however, my life didn’t begin until last year. In 2019, I completed a series of personal development courses that finally left me feeling free and autonomous. And while there were some big challenges in 2019, it ultimately led me to the point of choosing the nomadic life as I had earned my location independence.

Which meant that I had about five months to travel. Because pandemic lockdowns took effect in March.

So, here’s the “goofy” part about all this.

I worked my way to freedom because it was something I desired. I did it because I didn’t want my calendar to rule my life.

The world went into lockdown while I was visiting Calgary, AB (instead of Abbotsford, BC, where I’m currently positioned). And people kept asking me when I was leaving for Abbotsford. Of course, the authorities recommended against any travel for quite a while.

And I shared with others that I had created freedom for myself so that I wouldn’t need to make such decisions. I could pick up and go when I wanted to.

But some people don’t like suspense. Which taught me that it’s always good to let them know when you’re coming or going.

Well, here we are a little over a year later. And my life hasn’t been ruled by my calendar.

The difference now is, after a year of “freedom,” I’ve realized it’s important to have things to look forward to. Otherwise, every day is Groundhog Day, especially here in quarantine.

It's important to have things to look forward to. Click To Tweet

Not that there are as many things I can put into my calendar right now. But I can take webinars and courses. I can make phone calls. I can make coaching calls more affordable for my leads and prospects.

I can begin putting events in my calendar again.

My mentors always said:

Discipline is true freedom.

Discipline is true freedom. Click To Tweet

I guess they were right after all.

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Hold Your Horses, Cow-Person!

From: David Andrew Wiebe
To: You!

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