The Yin and Yang of a Music Career: Be a Good Hang

The Yin and Yang of a Music Career: Be a Good Hang

What did David learn about the yin and yang of a music career from Derek Sivers? Watch the latest video to find out.

Transcription:

In my 2009 interview with Derek Sivers, he kind of talked about the yin and yang of a music career.

If you’re just getting started and you’re not good at what you do just yet, he suggests you should spend plenty of time in the shed getting better at your craft.

Then, when you’re ready, start getting yourself out there. Make as many contacts and friends as you possibly can. It’s not about networking per se. It’s about getting out there and meeting people.

And he says that you’ve got to be a good hang because there’s a lot of well-publicized jerks out there. You may think you can behave that way and make it to the big time, and it usually doesn’t work that way. So, you want to be a good hang

Every Album You Make Can Be a NICHE Unto Itself

Every Album You Make Can Be a NICHE Unto Itself

Have you ever been told to focus on a specific genre as an artist? Have you been told NOT to color outside the lines? In this video, David shares an approach to releasing different styles of music that has a prove track record of working.

Transcription:

When I interviewed Derek Sivers in 2009, he said something interesting about albums that I’m not sure I even caught the first time, and that is this.

In the 60s, 70s, and 80s, artists like David Bowie and Paul Simon had very sharply defined focuses. Each album represented an idea. Whether it was experimental music or gospel music.

So, those of you who are having trouble defining your brand. One of the things you should be looking at is what is your niche for every album that you put out.

Each album can be a creation and a niche unto itself. And that way it’s way more fun and you get to express yourself creatively and musically in a variety of ways.

So, if you enjoyed this tip, make sure to check out my new book, Productivity, Performance & Profits Blackbook.

Don’t You Have ANY Original Thoughts?

Don’t You Have ANY Original Thoughts?

Sometimes, it can be easy to mistake thorough investigation with being “book smart.” In this video, David shares his process for creating content and why it is often rich with examples, stats, quotes, stories, and case studies.

Transcription:

In writing blog posts and scripting podcast episodes, I will sometimes reference relevant quotes or statistics or case studies that either complement or supplement the post in some way.

What’s interesting is sometimes people have come to me and gone, “Dude, like, don’t you have any of your own beliefs You’re always quoting other people and telling other people’s stories.”

And the funny part about that is I’m usually stating exactly what I think, and then supplementing it with references that prove my point.

Most people seem to love it that I provide links to additional resources and tools that help them in their music career.

And if you’re the kind of person that loves additional tools, resources, references, case studies, statistics that are going to help you create the life you love through music, then I think you’ll resonate with me just fine.

How to Achieve Artistic Freedom by Living BELOW Your Means

How to Achieve Artistic Freedom by Living BELOW Your Means

What can CD Baby founder Derek Sivers teach us about being frugal? How did he manage his finances? What was his mentality around income? In this video, David recounts what Sivers shared with him.

Transcription:

In 2009, I got to interview the founder of CD Baby, Derek Sivers. At 22, Derek quit his job, became a musician, and never looked back.

Now, I asked him how it is that he was able to do this, and what he told me was that he lived within his means. Many of us will interpret that to mean we should spend every dollar we make, whether we know it or not.

That’s how we think about living within one’s means, and that’s not how it works at all.

Derek said he didn’t get a car, he always took the subway, and he never went out to eat unless someone was treating him.

This is a commonality among many successful people I know, that they live below their means.

When you’ve got a year’s worth, or maybe even two year’s worth of expenses saved up, you don’t have to say “Yes” to projects that you don’t want to take on anymore. It’s a form of freedom you can’t earn any other way.

So, if you enjoyed this insight and you’d like more like it, check out my new book, Productivity, Performance & Profits Blackbook.

Tommy Tallarico’s BIG Gambit: How He Got Into The Music Industry

Tommy Tallarico’s BIG Gambit: How He Got Into The Music Industry

What can we learn from North America’s most prolific video game composer, Tommy Tallarico and the risks that he took to get where he’s at today? In this video, David recounts the story exactly as Tallarico shared it with him.

Transcription:

In 2007, I got to interview North America’s most prolific video game composer, Tommy Tallarico.

As the story goes, he was 21, living in Massachusetts with his parents. The only thing he knew was that he wanted to be part of the music industry, but he wasn’t even sure in what capacity.

One thing he had figured out was that if you’re going to do music, you need to be in L.A. So, he left his parents crying on the doorstep and left for L.A., and he lived under a pier for two weeks.

But on his first day, he found a job at Guitar Center selling keyboards. He wore a TurboGrafx-16 shirt to work. That’s a video game console, and it was brand new at the time.

So, in walks a producer from Virgin, sees the T-shirt, goes over and talks to Tommy, and asks him whether he wants a job on the spot. And he’s been in the video game industry ever since.

So, the question is, when’s the last time you’ve taken a big risk like that? And what are you willing to do to create the music career of your dreams?

You’re Invited!

You’re Invited!

How did David come up with the idea for Clean Slate? What are his reasons? What is his motivation?

In this video, David bears all.

Transcription:

Hey, it’s David. When I was 13, my father died in a motorcycle crash. We were living in Japan at the time and my family decided to move back to Canada and I experienced such a sense of culture shock. I felt like a fish out of water. Music gave me a voice at a time when I felt like I did not have a voice.

But my search continued. The absence of a parent still left me disempowered in life and I continued my search. At 25, I discovered personal development and I felt so inspired. I felt such a sense of empowerment and encouragement and inspiration that I felt like that is what I wanted to pass on to the world.

And that’s why I created Clean Slate. It mixes music and inspiration. It brings the two together and it’s a place where we get a fresh start and a new beginning, and you’re invited to Clean Slate. I’ll see you there.